Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic

Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic

Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic
The buildings of the Red Star Line, still exist (although in very bad shape). They are located in Antwerp near the Scheldt (river), from where the ships set off on the transatlantic voyage.

It remains a place of remembrance, a "lieu de mémoire" for the millions of emigrants who set out for a new life in the States via Antwerp. In 2010 the foundations of the new Red Star Line museum have started. There is a candid image of Albert Einstein in his leisure time, taken on one of many trips aboard Red Star Line vessels between Europe and America in the 1930s.

Nazis came into power in Einstein's homeland Germany, and he traveled to the U. On one of these huge passenger steamers for good, in a journey that may well have saved the Jewish physicist's life. The Nobel Prize winning scientist was one of 2.5 million people who sailed across the Atlantic with the boat company between 1873 and 1934 -- a quarter of them Jewish. This demure demitasse cup has survived as well..

Although there is no damage, cracks, repairs.... All in all the cup is preserved very well, there are a few slight marks I wish to point out, there is a rough spot on the interior base of the cup and a black (iron spot) on the right facing side of the red star logo and a tiny fleabite chip on the foot near the black dot. Both seen in the next to last and last photo. The turquoise and brown pattern was used in both The Red Star Line and later used in The White Star Line and as seen below, used aboard the Titanic. Were light and airy retreats far away from the bustle of most of the first-class areas.

They were the perfect place to enjoy an afternoon tea, coffee, or perhaps a favorite cordial. Brightly lit by large windows flanked by palms and ivy and set with wicker furniture, one could imagine a midsummer crossing and enjoying friends and conversation in such charming surroundings. A few early photos of the Verandah Cafés on. Shows the small turquoise-and-brown pattern in use, and I would have to believe the same held true for. Shown left is a demitasse set in the small pattern that would have been used in.

Both of the registration numbers 117214 and 324028 are explained below. S first-class passenger entered the dining room they would have been greeted by the small pattern side plates as shown to the left. This pattern was first produced by Wm. Brownfield & Son and carried the British Registration Number 7044 (issued in 1884). A British registration number is much like an U. Patent number, it protects a design by giving the number holder exclusive rights to the design.

In the case of a china table service, a protected design can include either the body shape of the ware or the decoration applied to it. To my knowledge the earliest production date that has surfaced on a small pattern piece that was made for White Star is 1891, and if Brownfield ever put the actual pattern number on the china I've neither seen nor heard of it. All turquoise-and-brown colored pieces from the first-class service were made of fine bone china and therefore are very fragile. Brownfield ceased to operate after 1891, but a known maker of this popular pattern during.

S short life was Bridgwood (Samson & Bridgwood). Because many White Star pieces are back-marked Stonier Co. Liverpool, many often mistakenly believe that Stonier was the maker of the china.

Stonier only brokered and distributed china, and did not actually produce the ware for White Star. John Stonier (founder of the company) did, however, partner with Duncan Bishop in 1891 to form a pottery company called Bisto. Virtually all pieces of the small pattern and the Crown pattern that we see today carry two registration numbers, 117214 and 324028 (1888 and 1898 respectively).

Several writers have reported that Rd. 117214 was issued in the year 1889. According to information from the British Patent Office in London, writers using the 1889 date for Rd. Patent Office records show the first registry number issued for the year 1889 was 117800; therefore, Rd. 117214 would have been issued in the later part of 1888.

One researcher has reported that registry number 117214 was issued to protect the White Star house flag and name ribbon below, and number 324028 was issued to protect the border decoration. When I corresponded with the U. Public Records Office regarding the double registration numbers, they stated that they had no information or reason for the multiple numbers. With further research it appears that 117214 may have been used for registering the border patterns, as pieces made in both the small and Crown pattern were also used by Red Star Line (and others) so it was not exclusive to White Star.

The earliest piece of White Star china that I've been able to date that bears the house flag and White Star Line ribbon is 1889, and all pieces that I. Have seen that were made prior to 1889 have had the circular Oceanic Steam Navigation Co.

Red Star Line also used both the Crown pattern and the small turquoise and brown pattern, and they carry the same registry numbers as White Star pieces, therefore I don't think that we can conclude that Rd. 117214 was issued to protect White Star Line's identity.

I n the last revision of this article rev. 3, I stated that it might be possible that the second registry number 324028, may have been issued to the potter in 1898 to protect the scalloped edge design of the white ware being used. However, since revision 3, a Crown pattern piece and a small turquoise and brown pattern piece has surfaced with production dates of 1889 and 1891 respectively.

Both dates are well before the date when 324028 was issued, making it doubtful that 324028 was issued for protecting the border decorations or the scalloped edge body design. Information regarding both registry numbers continues to remain elusive at best, but I will continue to keep a watchful eye for new information.

The manufacturing date of 3/1912 found on the underside of some first-class pieces is often touted as a date that was specific to. It is true that pieces bearing 3/1912 (as well as other dates) have been salvaged from. S wreckage, but White Star used the same first-class patterns on many ships; therefore, it is incorrect to assume that pieces bearing the 3/1912 date were intended for use on.

The item "Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic" is in sale since Friday, June 16, 2017. This item is in the category "Collectibles\Transportation\Boats & Ships\Cruise Ships & Ocean Liners\White Star & Titanic". The seller is "ton10131960" and is located in Bay Shore, New York. This item can be shipped worldwide.


Red Star Line demitasse cup, pattern later used on White Star's famous Titanic